#9

Still a couple of weeks behind with these weekly stories from the Facebook page, I'm catching up though :)

#9

This week I said goodbye to my brief of many years. This car was used as our only mode of transport for a long time. The speedo stopped at 167k miles or there abouts and I probably took it to 175k/180k 'ish'. It still runs but doesn't have an MOT, there's a few lights on the dash along with another few things needing fixed, I don't have the time to fix it to get it through another MOT so it's moved on. I swapped it along with £90 for a single speed bike from my brother. I think he got a good deal but the bikes great. I'm a terrible negotiator! 

Driving a car like that for work has a lot more Good points than bad. I got between 50 - 55 miles to the gallon, filled it up and it'd go to go for a while. Probably the main thing good point is that people think you're skint, I could drive into builders merchants and the guys would have some sort of weird respect because your driving an old beat up car and 'trying' People are weird like that. People don't take you serious as a business person and that's the best part, I was just a guy driving an old car to work, like one of the guys you see on the motorway with sheets of plywood and ladders on the roof, you can't see in the windows because it's filled with tools, one of they guys that you shake your head at and think 'moron' while driving past. 

The whole 'dress for success' or 'look like you mean business' and whatever other stuff you read in the books doesn't really mean much. I found that you don't need to have a nice work vehicle or act like a wank business man to make money and live. This vehicle took me and my tools onto a £4.3million estate in the middle of nowhere to do some work, in an 8 month period not that many years ago I turned over just under £300k with this as my only work vehicle. It was kinda like being rich. It's sat in the driveway and acted as extra drying space when I've got a big finishing job and I'm tight on space, I've made some good doh' in this thing and I'll miss it. 

Anyway all the money's spent though because I've got a wee penchant for Los Angeles and trying to do the whole 'not working' thing for a part of the year, I've had low to moderate success at that, I'm now trying to work as much as I can for a full year and see what the possibilities are like to take a bit of the following year off. I think success rate is low with that idea too. There's too much work, you can work for 24 for a long time and there's still work to be done.

This week was still as busy, I needed to get a new vehicle sorted and that's took up a bit of time but it's al sorted now and next week looks to be super busy again. I've got a few doors getting finished, a few cabinets for a restaurant starting, working through an oak office and taking a look at a pine kitchen that's getting made, there's a lot to do. Lewis has a real job so works at night and weekends, I've got one of my friends working on weekends too to get through the work. I'm not sure about taking someone on full time, sometimes if there's not loads of work I'll take a month off and that doesn't go down well when you've got an employee needing wages every week, I try to get people into the mindset of taking time off and just messing about but it's a tricky one, not everyone's into it. Sometimes I feel like the guy chapping at people's door and asking if they're coming out to play but the mum's like "no, he has homework then he's going for a bath to get ready for tomorrow" Not everyone's into the idea of having time off, not time off to go on holiday just time off to mess about. I think it's good for you though.

With the new bike I traded for the car, I changed the wheels and handlebars, we had some spare parts so Lewis got an old Reynolds frame from the back garden and whacked together a fixed gear, it looks great but trying to stop on one is tricky, like tricky as in you smash your balls on the handlebar stem. He has no brakes so if you see him flying about the village just move to the side. 

Onwards